Common Injuries That Causes Hip Pain


The hips can withstand repetitive motions and fair numbers of wear and tear. The ball and socket joint in the hips are the largest in the body, and it is with good reason – this anatomical space allows fluid movement.

When you try to move your hips (for example by walking, running or dancing), the cartilage in the ball and socket prevents friction and cushions some of the shock that the hips encounter.

Despite how strong your hip muscles and bones are, they are not indestructible. As you age, the cartilage can wear down to the point of damage. When it happens. you can easily fall out of balance and most likely get injured.

Other age-related conditions and physical issues contribute to the pain as well. For younger people, hip pains are usually injury-related or caused by overuse of the muscles.

Here is a rundown on the hip problems that a persona can experience in his or her lifetime.

Hip Flexor Strain

The hip flexors are a group of muscles that work together to lift your thighs upward. These collective of muscles also contribute to lifting your trunk while in a lying down position, especially during sit ups.

A hip flexor strain is associated with tightness or pain at the hips and is usually caused by poor physical fitness, excessive and repetitive hip motions, or tears to the acetabulum – the cartilage lining that cushions the joint.

Osteoarthritis in the Hip

Osteoarthritis is a degenerative condition resulting from the wear and tear of the muscles and ligaments in the hips. As this disease progresses, the cartilage in the hips become thinner and inflammation occurs.

In some cases, the protective cartilage wears down altogether to the point of inflicting excruciating pain to the person. The symptoms of osteoarthritis will develop slowly over the number of years. One possible natural solution to remedy this pain is to use dietary supplements like the turmeric curcumin by earthwell, which has been shown to produce good results.

Rectus Femoris Tendon Rupture

The rectus femoris is one of the powerful quadriceps muscles in your body. This tendon rupture at the top of the muscle near the hips is a result of explosive movements or overuse.

The rectus femoris is a muscle that crosses two joints and is used to lift up and extend the knees. As the main cause of this problem is excessive use of the muscle, many professional football players and runners suffer from this problem.

Hip Sprain

A so-called hip sprain is a type of injury to one of the ligaments in the surrounding your hip joint. This rarely happens but it can occur to people who experience a powerful force on the leg (likely caused by accident or trauma), forcing the ligaments to overstretch.

The pain is always evident at the front part of the hips and this is due to the thigh bone being forced backwards. You can differentiate hip strain between hip flexor strain by lifting the thigh forward. If there is absence of pain, then you are experiencing hip strain.

Hip Tendonitis

Hip tendonitis is the inflammation of the tendons in the hips. This condition usually occurs when the hip tendons are in a lot of strain, either caused by abrupt physical activity or biochemical problems.

The first symptom is some tenderness on the specific point of the hips where the tendon originates. The hips may also feel tight, especially in the mornings after you wake up.

Ilium Apophysitis

Ilium Apophysitis is an injury that results to a dull pain at the front of the hips. This usually occurs among children and adolescents who still have underdeveloped and soft apophysis in the hips.

Younger people involved in sports usually suffer from this, especially those who suffer with tight hip muscles. If the muscles keep on pulling on the apophysis this can result in irritation or inflammation on this area.

People who are suffering from hip pain may be experiencing a simple muscle strain that can be relieved by stretching. But it could also be caused by serious injuries that would possibly require surgery. Call your doctor if you are experiencing hip pains that are associated with redness, swelling and warmth around the joints for more than two weeks.

in Pain | 709 Words

Relationship between posture, mobility and stability


The human body is a complex system of systems stacked upon each other, each relying on the other. It is important to know that when one area of the body is in pain, the surrounding parts are also likely to develop a problem. This means when one body part is in pain, it is very likely that its surrounding areas are also experiencing a problem.

In this article, let us talk about lower back pain. What exactly causes it?

There are many reasons why your back is prone to pain. Back pain happens when there is a problem in your spinal joints, muscles, discs or nerves. Sometimes, the issue may start with a simple muscle tightness which then radiates to spinal problem.

The back is suppose to stay steady while the hips remain mobile. But when a person experiences lower back pain due to poor hip flexor muscles, they also suffer from tightness resulting to less movements and unstable spine. This means when dealing with a problem such as back pain, we need to think of it as an integrated system.

To prevent the back from flexing or extending and keep it steady, the hips should be mobile enough to withstand our movements. If the hips are mobile and flexible, the spine will stop wobbling from trying to carry your weight and it will remain stable.

Why is mobility and flexibility important in preventing pain? Let us first define what mobility and flexibility means and how important they are to our health.

Mobility usually happens because of the existence of your joints. It is the area where two bones meet and it is the space where surrounding tissues, muscles, tendons and ligaments are out of the way. Think of mobility as the range of unhibited motion happening in the joint. When a person has a good mobility, he or she can perform any movement without restrictions.

Flexibility on the other hand is the range of motion in a joint or the distance and direction that the joint can move. It directly correlates with range of motion and mobility, but does not directly correlate with balance, strength and coordination.

In contrast, mobility requires coordination, balance and strength to perform a certain movement. Flexibility on the other hand may not require the same factors as mobility does. This means a person who is flexible does not automatically mean that he or she has great mobility.

Knowing which area in the body that needs the right approach is a massive step towards getting out of pain and improving movement. When there are tight muscles, there are also weak muscles. One big mistake people make when trying to alleviate back pain is that they immediately address the weakness of their back by trying to slowly incorporate strength training.

While building muscle strength is important in preventing pain, the back will never be fully restored to its optimal health when its lack of motion (caused by tightness of the muscle, in this case tight hip flexors) is not addressed.

The key to addressing back pain is to identify the tight areas first and apply corrective strategies next. After these steps are taken, you can now work on strengthening the muscles to prevent the pain from coming back.

Many therapist will work on your mobility first for one reason only – the joints are restricted (at the thoracic spine) it will be difficult to stretch the muscles. This can be easily identified by a chiropractor or a massage therapist.

When back pain has already progressed, it is important to see a practitioner and join a treatment program. Although there are many remedies to back pain, your case might already require mobility drills and extensive muscle stretching.

How To Avoid Osteoporosis


Those people with rheumatoid arthritis who take corticosteroids, even at low doses, are at risk for osteoporosis, the thinning of our bones that can make them crumble or break. Steroids diminish your body’s ability to absorb calcium from the intestines and hamper the manufacture of new bone.

Osteoporosis primarily affects the bones of the hip, wrists, and spine. It results in about 1.3 million fractures a year, including spinal fractures in one-third of women older than 65. Preventive measures are particularly important because there are no early warning signs of osteoporosis: The first indications may be a decrease in height or the formation of a dowager’s hump as bone in the spine collapses.

Your body borrows calcium daily from your bones for your blood to use. But it also redeposits calcium regularly from the food you eat, so new bone is continually being formed. Around age 40 to 44, the regrowth begins to slow down, and we begin to lose more bone than we manufacture. Add steroids to the mix, and the loss accelerates.

To make matters worse, as we get older, it also gets harder for our bodies to absorb calcium just when we tend to be eating less and in general taking in less calcium in our diets.

Extra vitamin D and calcium, however, can prevent or slow osteoporosis. Most women need 1,500 milligrams of calcium per day, and men need 1,000. The daily requirement for vitamin D is 400 international units (IU), but double that for people older than 50. (Based on blood tests, however, your doctor may recommend a higher dose.)

In a study on rheumatoid arthritis, people on corticosteroids who took supplements of 1,000 milligrams of calcium and 500 IU of vitamin D daily had an increase in bone mineral thickness in their lower spines. Those who didn’t get the supplements had a 3 percent bone loss each year. (The supplements had no effect on bone thickness in people who didn’t take corticosteroids.)

Nutritionists generally recommend trying to get your nutrients through food rather than supplements, however. This is both because you’re less likely to overdose on foods and because nutrients may work better when they’re in a “package deal” all wrapped up with other essential nutrients in healthy food. Here are good dietary ways to shore up your stores of calcium and its vital bone-building partner, vitamin D.